Friday Five with Oscar Diaz in home furnishings  Category

Designer Oscar Diaz, who studied in Bordeaux and London and trained in Paris and Tokyo, approaches his work not from a stylistic standpoint, but by examining in what context they’ll be used, and  then layering in aspects that reflect its cultural connotations. From metal-coated cutlery created from parts of supermarket-sourced plastic bottles, to glass candle holders in which magnets are incorporated to adjust its height, Diaz’s work is as brainy as it is playful. Curious as to what makes Diaz go, we invited him to put forth a Design Milk Friday Five.

Friday Five with Oscar Diaz in home furnishings  Category

1. Jam Spoon by MUJI
Somehow between a knife and a spoon, the Silicone Jam Spoon from Muji makes my Sundays. The hard handle ends with a soft spoon that allows you to scrap the jam jar without making any noise, and then spread it with just one gesture. It’s ideal if you like a quiet Sunday morning.

Friday Five with Oscar Diaz in home furnishings  Category
Photo: via MoMA-Courtesy Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York. © 2008 Olafur Eliasson

2. Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson always manage to incorporate the powerful feeling of nature into his installations. It is difficult to describe them; you must just experience them.

Friday Five with Oscar Diaz in home furnishings  Category

3. Car boot sales
Car boot sales are where all objects become equal. I love to find stuff all mixed up without a hierarchy or marketing strategy; it literally put things into perspective for me. A car boot sale is also a good place to find small treasures, things waiting to have a second life.

Friday Five with Oscar Diaz in home furnishings  Category
Photo: korobokkuru on Flickr

4. Wabi-sabi
I find Wabi-sabi objects very inspiring. Here in the West, we don’t normally value imperfections and the patina that comes from prolonged use. But use lends character, and without it the world would be quite boring.

Friday Five with Oscar Diaz in home furnishings  Category

5. Enzo Mari
Enzo Mari designs are always surprisingly simple and at the same time a bit raw. It seems his objects have evolved to the point where nothing else could be removed.