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Looking Up: A Textile Collection by Raleigh Denim for Bernhardt Design

09.30.15 | By
Looking Up: A Textile Collection by Raleigh Denim for Bernhardt Design
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Sarah Yarborough and Victor Lytvinenko are the brains behind Raleigh Denim, a brand they launched in 2007 with a mission to rekindle American craftsmanship and the once-thriving North Carolina textile industry. Their initial focus was handcrafted, limited-edition collections of jeans, concentrating on quality over quantity, and over the years the company has steadily gained a loyal and much-deserved following with each new venture. Now, the duo has partnered with Bernhardt Design on their first textile collection they’ve named Looking Up.

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The celestial unknown… that same wonder we all experienced as children, which was the result of staring up at sky and imagining, is the inspiration behind the collection.

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As Yarborough says:

Stars serve as a visual ceiling to our world, and they are ever-changing depending on location, distance and time. These constantly shifting perspectives allowed us to create multiple textile designs built from the same concept.

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The collection is made up of four patterns that are available in 32 color ways.

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Flight falls right in line with the brand as they covered their first store’s ceiling with 5,000 paper planes!

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Caroline Williamson is Editorial Director of Design Milk. She has a BFA in photography from SCAD and can usually be found searching for vintage wares, doing New York Times crossword puzzles in pen, or reworking playlists on Spotify.