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This Palm Beach Residence Goes Bold, Glam, and Eclectic

The pandemic has made traveling for work difficult for many over the last two years, especially between countries. Vancouver B.C.-based Gillian Segal has not let travel restrictions stop her from taking on non-local interior design projects – instead, she’s working her magic from afar. Without stepping foot in Florida, Segal designed this entire Palm Beach Residence remotely, turning it from a spec house into a modern home with a bold, glam, and eclectic personality.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock (i.e. off social media), you’ll likely recognize the iconic Ultrafragola mirror designed by Ettore Sottsass in 1970. It appears white when not lit up and then pops with a neon pink glow when turned on – either way making a bold statement. The curves and color of the mirror are complemented by the rosy pink sofa by Moving Mountains on the opposite wall. The dark, moody walls and ceiling add drama while making the unique furnishings really stand out.

The office has a sophisticated yet tranquil feel with its monochromatic palette of greens and vintage furnishings.

The modern kitchen might be mostly white but it’s far from plain and stark. Earthy tones warm up the white cabinets and surfaces, especially the swagged, glass-linked light fixture by Trueing Studio hanging above the large island, the kitchen hardware from Sun Valley Bronze, and the Thomas Hayes barstools.

The other side of the kitchen continues the feel with a custom marble dining table, vintage rattan light fixture, and Kelly Wearstler chairs in a Pierre Frey stripe fabric.

The cozy family room feels whimsical yet bold with a pair of Utretch chairs in a patterned Kelly Wearstler fabric, Bzippy side tables, and an array of vintage Charlotte Perriand sconces on the wall.

The children’s rooms are comfortable and playful, designed to suit their individual personalities.

Photos by Nick Mele.

Caroline Williamson is Editorial Director of Design Milk. She has a BFA in photography from SCAD and can usually be found searching for vintage wares, doing New York Times crossword puzzles in pen, or reworking playlists on Spotify.